Postindustrial Logo

A boy walks along the foggy streets of the McDonald Heights neighborhood of Aliquippa, Beaver County, Pa. on May 7, 2015. Photograph by Pete Marovich.

The faces and places of Appalachia

Crowdsourced project gives a fresh look at the region

~

By KIMBERLY PALMIERO // PHOTOS USED WITH PERMISSION/LOOKING AT APPALACHIA


The West Virginia photographer behind a one-of-a-kind exhibit wants to show the many faces and places of Appalachia beyond stereotypes.

Roger May, a self-described “son of Mingo County” issued a call in 2014 for photographs of a region that’s been fodder for visual tropes of poverty and despair in the last half-century.

Almost immediately, images began to pour in.

“This takes a fresh look at a region that is often visually maligned.”

Postindustrial, The faces and places of Appalachia By Kimberly Palmiero

A boy riding a bicycle, June 16, 2016. Schuylkill Haven, Schuylkill County, Pa., on June 16, 2016. Photograph by Andrew Wertz.

Postindustrial, The faces and places of Appalachia By Kimberly Palmiero

A woman in Shenandoah, Schuylkill County, Pa, on Aug. 20, 2016. Photograph by Andrew Wertz.

Today, the Looking at Appalachia project contains a trove of visuals from 13 states. More than 60 of those photographs by 45 contributors are part of an exhibit at Ohio University in Athens through Feb. 28.

“This takes a fresh look at a region that is often visually maligned and sort of used to illustrate whatever example of the narrative of poverty they want to make,” May said.

The increased use of phones that can take photographs and lower prices for cameras means that more people can document day-to-day living. And that’s reflected in some of the submissions May received.

“Some of my favorite email submissions start with ‘I’m not a photographer but…this is what I see looking out my front door and this is what I see looking out of my driveway and it’s important to me to be considered to be for the project,’” he said.

Postindustrial, The faces and places of Appalachia By Kimberly Palmiero

Emily Kuzma of Downtown Pittsburgh, stands with her rental skates by the skate room window at Neville Roller Drome, on April 24, 2016. "We're trying to rebuild the skate community here in Pittsburgh," said rink owner/operator Jim Park, of West View, a lifelong skater himself. Park purchased the Neville Roller Drome, the rink where his father first took him to learn to skate as a 6-year-old. Neville Island, Allegheny County, Pa. Photograph by Stephanie Strasburg.

“Some of my favorite email submissions start with ‘I’m not a photographer but…this is what I see looking out my front door and this is what I see looking out of my driveway and it’s important to me to be considered to be for the project.”

Postindustrial, The faces and places of Appalachia By Kimberly Palmiero

Roger May, founder of the Looking at Appalachia project

May himself is not a full-time photographer but views the medium as a powerful way to shape perception.

“Photography is a democratic thing — it is to me anyway — and it was important to me that this be accessible,” he said.

As the founder, he directs Looking at Appalachia and has an editorial team that helps to select the images.

It was images, too, that gave rise to May’s effort.

A series of photos in Kentucky in the 1960s drew national attention to a poverty-stricken lot of rural families in parts of Appalachia. There were mothers, looking bone-tired, holding babies, their faces smudged with dirt. Homes without plumbing. This was, Americans might view, the face of rural poverty.

In the 1950s and 60s, economic collapse in gripped Eastern Kentucky as mechanization meant fewer jobs in coal mines.

The photographers Andrew Stern and John Dominis, among others, documented the hardscrabble lives of some of those families and indelible images of rural suffering that fueled a sense of public pity.

Around the same time, President Lyndon Johnson declared the War on Poverty, which led to modern-day Medicare, Medicaid, food stamps, Head Start, job initiatives, and more — today’s federal safety net for the most vulnerable.

The Looking at Appalachia project is described on the site as an “archive will serve as a reference that is defined by its people as opposed to political legislation.

Postindustrial Kimberly Palmiero

Kimberly Palmiero is CEO and Editor-in-Chief of Postindustrial. She also is a senior editor for iGeneration Youth and immediate past president of the nonprofit Press Club of Western Pennsylvania. A small business owner, she also was a managing editor for Trib Total Media. She is based in Pittsburgh.

Related Stories

Sign Up for the Free Daily Postindustrial

Get a daily digest of the Postindustrial's newest and most popular stories.

Support Postindustrial

A morning roundup of headlines about the Rust Belt and Appalachia, delivered straight to your inbox.